Forums

×

Warning

JUser: :_load: Unable to load user with ID: 28092
Resolved
0 votes
I have been using ClearOS since the days of ClarkConnect but have never had 2 hard drives in my machine, and on top of that I know nothing about Linux. So I have decided that installing ClearOS on a 32Gb SSD and a 320Gb HD for shared storage would be a good idea. So I installed the ClearOS 64 bit, however the Installation does not give me an option for "Create Custom Layout" as shown here http://www.clearcenter.com/support/documentation/clearos_install_guide/installation_wizard. I have installed the Storage Manager, this should be standard I really feel, and it shows both drives are LVM. I have read "Storage Manipulation Using Bindmounts" http://www.clearcenter.com/support/documentation/clearos_guides/storage_manipulation_using_bindmounts, but the first thing I noticed was that it was for ClearOS version 5. So my questions:

1. Is the documentation for version 5 still relevant?

2. Is the Installation Wizard no longer used or is just for enterprise?

3. After reading so many pages on setting up hard drives I am seeing double, is there any up to date documentation for setting up my drives that anyone knows of?

Thank you in advance for any help that can be given.
Wednesday, April 15 2015, 12:08 AM
Share this post:
Responses (15)
  • Accepted Answer

    Monday, May 04 2015, 08:17 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    Well Nick you are a savior. I recently upgraded my ClearOS machine, was using an old P-3 667 MHz with ClearOS 5.2 with a single hard drive, and all worked well. Like I said, I do not know Linux and will forget all this by the next time I need it. I am saving all this for the next time, thanks again Nick.
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Saturday, May 02 2015, 08:56 PM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    You need to add the line:
    /dev/sdb1 /mnt/disk2 ext3 defaults,noatime 1 1
    (or the equivalent UUID line) to the file /etc/fstab and probably before the line which binds /mnt/disk2 to your flexshares. It is not a command you can run on its own. The command "mount -a" reads this file and processes it, though during start up it may be some other command which processes the file. The permission denied bit is because ClearOS thinks you are trying to execute a command /dev/sdb1, but it is not an executable file.

    An easier way to edit files, if you are not used to vi, is to use the editor "nano", so "nano /etc/fstab". Even easier is to edit it remotely from a workstation. If your workstation runs Windoze, get hold of a copy of WinSCP for graphical file management and a text editor and PuTTy for a remote console. You will then virtually never need to use the server console.
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Saturday, May 02 2015, 08:14 PM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    Ok, tried what you suggested and here is what I got:

    [root@gateway ~]# ls -l /dev/disk/by-uuid
    total 0
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 May 1 03:47 2846ee13-9e2b-4242-963c-5275c2b990bd -> ../../sda1
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 May 1 03:47 850f6679-7e4b-42bb-82d5-b2a24d559aef -> ../../dm-1
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 May 1 03:47 c7af0731-6976-4497-b1e2-ac621498b4b8 -> ../../sdb1
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 May 1 03:47 cfeaf627-332f-4cba-9244-9b584f612331 -> ../../dm-0
    [root@gateway ~]# /dev/sdb1 /mnt/disk2 ext3 defaults,noatime 1 1
    -bash: /dev/sdb1: Permission denied

    did find the blkid command mentioned on a webpage:

    [root@gateway ~]# blkid
    /dev/sda1: UUID="2846ee13-9e2b-4242-963c-5275c2b990bd" TYPE="ext4"
    /dev/sda2: UUID="KmA4C7-QB63-KuJ8-YL13-9lpT-P2D7-v8TUZC" TYPE="LVM2_member"
    /dev/sdb1: UUID="c7af0731-6976-4497-b1e2-ac621498b4b8" TYPE="ext3"
    /dev/mapper/vg_gateway-lv_root: UUID="cfeaf627-332f-4cba-9244-9b584f612331" TYPE="ext4"
    /dev/mapper/vg_gateway-lv_swap: UUID="850f6679-7e4b-42bb-82d5-b2a24d559aef" TYPE="swap"

    Yes I did use ext3, saw it in the instructions and remembered it being used in the past.

    reading this http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/linux-finding-using-uuids-to-update-fstab/ was able to look at fstab

    [root@gateway ~]# vi /etc/fstab






    # /etc/fstab
    # Created by anaconda on Wed Apr 29 07:46:11 2015
    #
    # Accessible filesystems, by reference, are maintained under '/dev/disk'
    # See man pages fstab(5), findfs(8), mount(8) and/or blkid(8) for more info
    #
    /dev/mapper/vg_gateway-lv_root / ext4 defaults 1 1
    UUID=2846ee13-9e2b-4242-963c-5275c2b990bd /boot ext4 defaults 1 2
    /dev/mapper/vg_gateway-lv_swap swap swap defaults 0 0
    tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0
    devpts /dev/pts devpts gid=5,mode=620 0 0
    sysfs /sys sysfs defaults 0 0
    proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
    /mnt/disk2 /var/flexshare/shares/storage none defaults,bind 0 0


    I just looked, and have gone no further, the permission denied while being logged in as root surprised me.
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Friday, May 01 2015, 09:10 PM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    The instructions you are followed are OK but only go as far as temporarily mounting the drive (although I'd always use a live disk like gparted to partition a disk rather than the command line). To mount it permanently you need to edit /etc/fstab. You can mount disks by device name, label or UUID. Label is not so common. ClearOS (and presumably RHEL) now favour UUID but used to use device. To find the UUID, from a command prompt do:
    ls -l /dev/disk/by-uuid
    Then add either:
    /dev/sdb1               /mnt/disk2                 ext3    defaults,noatime 1 1
    or
    UUID=e0fa15a4-f2a8-41d7-99eb-368587a8972a	/mnt/disk2                 ext3    defaults,noatime 1 1
    Change the ext3 label to whichever file system you used when you formatted the partition. Your instructions used ext3, ClearOS6 tends to use ext4. Change the UUID to whatever yours is. If you use PuTTy you can copy from the session just by selecting the text.

    [edit]
    I forgot to add that the advantage of using the UUID is that it should be unique to every partition. The disk device /dev/sdX, and therefore the partition sdXn, can change if you add or remove disks or change the port the device plugs into.
    [/edit]
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Friday, May 01 2015, 08:27 PM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    Bingo, you got it Nick! Moving 207Gb of data onto my new HTPC, and will backup the rest of what I have stored on that drive before I go any further, I need to get ready for work, but will try anything you can think of to make this permanent when I get home. Do not know if I missed a step or something is missing on those webpages, which is a shame since the steps in the webpages were quite easy to follow. Thanks for the help Nick.
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Friday, May 01 2015, 04:08 PM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    As I said before, I don't know the LVM, but your second disk, sdb, is that part of your LV? I suspect that was the disk you disconnected when loading ClearOS. Is that correct? If so, it looks like the disk is not mounted and you will need to mount /dev/sdb1 into /mnt/disk2. You can check by using something like WinSCP and seeing if you can navigate to below /mnt/disk2. Perhaps try, from the command line:
    mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt/disk2
    If this works we'll have to work on making this permanent.
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Friday, May 01 2015, 10:04 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    OK, I think what I was afraid of happening, happened. I went ahead and turned off the drive in the bios settings that I wanted to use for flexshare storage, then reinstalled ClearOS. After ClearOS was up and running and updated I turned the drive back on in bios and followed the following instructions:

    First - http://ubuntupop.blogspot.com/2013/04/how-to-add-new-hard-disk-to-clearos-64.html

    Second - http://ubuntupop.blogspot.com/2013/04/how-to-add-new-disk-for-flexshare.html

    This seemed to work great and I was able to transfer some files from a computer I was replacing. After I had my new computer up and running I updated my ClearOS machine's Network Map, DNS Server and DHCP Server for the new computer. However the Network Map kept trying to map the old computer, so I thought maybe rebooting the ClearOS machine might clear it up. When I went to transfer the files back to the new computer the Flexshare folder is empty. I am hoping someone can help me get my files back.

    [root@gateway ~]# fdisk -l

    Disk /dev/sda: 32.0 GB, 32017047552 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 3892 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00065454

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 1 64 512000 83 Linux
    Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
    /dev/sda2 64 3893 30752768 8e Linux LVM

    Disk /dev/sdb: 320.1 GB, 320072933376 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x40000000

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdb1 1 38913 312568641 83 Linux

    Disk /dev/mapper/vg_gateway-lv_root: 28.3 GB, 28286386176 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 3438 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000


    Disk /dev/mapper/vg_gateway-lv_swap: 3200 MB, 3200253952 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 389 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000

    [root@gateway ~]# mount
    /dev/mapper/vg_gateway-lv_root on / type ext4 (rw)
    proc on /proc type proc (rw)
    sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw)
    devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,gid=5,mode=620)
    tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw)
    /dev/sda1 on /boot type ext4 (rw)
    /mnt/disk2 on /var/flexshare/shares/storage type none (rw,bind)
    none on /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc type binfmt_misc (rw)
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, April 28 2015, 10:43 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    That is default install wizard settings, I just changed the LVM names as suggested by a web page I read. I guess that the hardest thing for me to get my mind around is all the different ways to set up the drives, oh there are so many times I miss the good old days of MS-DOS. Well I need sleep, try to look at it again before I go into work, if my 5 year old modem is acting better. Thanks for taking a look Nick.
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, April 28 2015, 07:25 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    Ouch. You've used the LVM. There is nothing wrong with that; it is just that I don't use it and don't know how to read how it is working. Sorry.
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, April 28 2015, 12:03 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    Hope I got this right, I know Windows is frowned upon, but I am very comfortable with it and Linux I am just too scared of messing something up.

    [root@gateway ~]# fdisk -l

    Disk /dev/sda: 32.0 GB, 32017047552 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 3892 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00065454

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 1 64 512000 83 Linux
    Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
    /dev/sda2 64 3893 30752768 8e Linux LVM

    Disk /dev/sdb: 320.1 GB, 320072933376 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x40000000

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdb1 1 38914 312569856 8e Linux LVM

    Disk /dev/mapper/main-lv_root: 28.3 GB, 28286386176 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 3438 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000


    Disk /dev/mapper/main-lv_swap: 3200 MB, 3200253952 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 389 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000


    Disk /dev/mapper/data0-data0: 320.1 GB, 320067338240 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38912 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000

    [root@gateway ~]# mount
    /dev/mapper/main-lv_root on / type ext4 (rw)
    proc on /proc type proc (rw)
    sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw)
    devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,gid=5,mode=620)
    tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw)
    /dev/sda1 on /boot type ext4 (rw)
    none on /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc type binfmt_misc (rw)
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Monday, April 27 2015, 06:13 PM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    What is the output of:
    fdisk -l
    mount
    ... and please put the output between "code" tags.
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Monday, April 27 2015, 04:07 PM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    LOL, bad time to start this post with the site move, just was able to log in for the first time.

    So, I have figured out half of my problems. When I got this machine I put in the oldest video card I had sitting around, an ATI Rage II +dvd with a whopping 4mb. Well ClearOS up and running might not have any issue with the video card, the install wizard does. I do not mind the old setup screens, however it was not giving me any options to modify the disk partitions. I have since installed a newer video card and the install wizard works great.

    So I have my second hard drive setup as data0 using the install wizard, but I think flexshares is using my main drive. I could be wrong, like I said know nothing about Linux. I did find this web page http://ubuntupop.blogspot.com/2013/04/how-to-add-new-disk-for-flexshare.html and my question now is what is my disk2 called. When I use the df command I do not see the second drive, but Storage Manager does show /dev/sdb and that it is in use.
    Attachments:
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Thursday, April 16 2015, 12:20 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    Nice
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Thursday, April 16 2015, 12:14 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    The bindmounts document was written for ClearOS 6 and should be up to date.

    You should see the options for manipulating the drives during the installation on all installs of ClearOS (except for ClearBOX, ClearBOX already uses the method set up in that document.)
    The reply is currently minimized Show
  • Accepted Answer

    Wednesday, April 15 2015, 01:17 AM - #Permalink
    Resolved
    0 votes
    The reply is currently minimized Show
Your Reply