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Hopefully I am being stupid and not seeing something glaringly obvious here...
Why when I am on this kernel and there are no kernels available update/upgrade and I getting a newer version when I install kernel-devel?


uname -a
Linux SERVER 2.6.32-358.23.2.v6.x86_64 #1 SMP Mon Oct 21 19:42:05 MDT 2013 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

yum update kernel
<snip>
Setting up Update Process
No Packages marked for Update

yum install kernel-devel
<snip>
Resolving Dependencies
--> Running transaction check
---> Package kernel-devel.x86_64 0:2.6.32-431.11.2.v6 will be installed
--> Finished Dependency Resolution
<snip>
Installing:
kernel-devel x86_64 2.6.32-431.11.2.v6 clearos-addons 8.8 M


Find myself having to go grab the newer kernel from the FTP site and install it to be able to compile anything....
Not the end of the world but surely I am missing something obvious? Done this on about 10 systems so far on v6.5 so I know it's not the registration etc...

/me scratching head
Any ideas? :S
Cheers!

Jim
Tuesday, April 15 2014, 05:21 PM
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Responses (4)
  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, April 15 2014, 08:12 PM - #Permalink
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    Cool. Thanks for the clarification.
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  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, April 15 2014, 08:06 PM - #Permalink
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    Jim Robinson wrote:
    I am used to the -devel and -headers being older than the installed kernel but never newer than the installed kernel. Def. had me scratching my head. Maybe the Devs will see this and cast 'magic spell of explanation'.... ;)
    If it has not been fixed, the reason is/was that the new kernel went to updates-testing which is normally disabled but the support packages went straight to somewhere like clearos-updates which is enabled. When they went there the older packages were removed. The kernel would only get pushed through to clearos-updates at a later time. Something tells me this may not be an issue now but as I block kernel updates I would not see it.
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  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, April 15 2014, 06:27 PM - #Permalink
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    Hey Nick,

    Thanks for the tips, I will definitely give them a go next time I run into this.
    I am used to the -devel and -headers being older than the installed kernel but never newer than the installed kernel. Def. had me scratching my head. Maybe the Devs will see this and cast 'magic spell of explanation'.... ;)

    For anyone ending up here looking for the work-around - I am hitting this URL and manually grabbing kernel-* and installing:


    http://mirror.clearfoundation.com/clearos/professional/6/updates/x86_64/RPMS/


    3 packaged: kernel-*
    Then in the folder you download to...


    yum install kernel-*


    And of course, as Nick reminds us, a reboot to load latest kernel...

    Jim
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  • Accepted Answer

    Tuesday, April 15 2014, 06:02 PM - #Permalink
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    No you are not missing the obvious and I am not comfortable with the way this works either. I've taken it up with the devs but got nowhere. It seems that you only ever have available the last couple of versions of kernel-headers and kernel-devel which update themselves automatically overnight. The problem arises if you do not restart your system, in which case you can end up with a very old kernel running and no way of getting the old -headers or -devel packages. This forces you to reboot which I think is pants for a high availability system.

    I think it can get worse (but have not checked recently) where kernel-headers and -devel updates get pushed through before the kernel updates. In this case you used to be able to get into a position where you could not get hold of the packags for the current kernel. They may have fixed this one.

    You can block kernel updated by adding:
    exclude=kernel,kernel-devel,kernel-firmware,kernel-headers
    to /etc/yum.conf. Comment out the line when you want to get an update. Then you can control it yourself.

    Now I've had my rant I realise you can still get your headers and devel packages (luckily). Try something like:
    yum install kernel-devel-`uname -r` kernel-headers-`uname -r`
    You'll need to block kernel updates afterwards or the packages will get updated overnight.
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